Wheel Of The Year: The Pagan Festivals Calendar

As the Wheel of the Year turns, so do the pagan festivals that mark its progress. It symbolizes the Sabbats (religious festivals) followed by Neo-Paganism and the Wicca movement. There are eight of them in all, each one celebrating a different aspect of life and nature. The major solar events of the year (solstices and equinoxes) and their midpoints are all celebrated at these festivals.

The four solar events are known by various pagan traditions as “quarter days,” while syncretic treatments frequently refer to the four midpoint events as “cross-quarter days.” The precise time of each celebration varies depending on the particular sect of modern Paganism.

Origins:

Neo-pagan wheel of the year
Neo-pagan wheel of the year : Brenton.eccles

The Wheel of the Year festival dates back to pre-Christian times. It was originally a Celtic festival but has since been adopted by many other pagan traditions. The name “Wheel of the Year” is a modern construct; the term is not found in any ancient texts.

The festivals themselves are rooted in the cycles of life, death, and regeneration that are so central to nature. They celebrate the changing seasons and the cycle of birth, growth, decline, and rebirth that is inherent in all of life.

The Wheel of the Year festivals also reflect the impact of the agricultural year on human society. In agrarian cultures, these festivals were a time to give thanks for the bounty of the earth and to ask for continued blessings in the months to come. They were also a time to celebrate the cycle of life, death, and rebirth that is inherent in all of nature.

The eight festivals can be divided into two halves: the light half of the year and the dark half of the year. The light half of the year begins with Samhain, when the veil between the worlds is at its thinnest and we honor our ancestors who have gone before us. It culminates in Beltane, when the fertility of the earth is at its peak and we celebrate life in all its forms.

The dark half of the year begins with Lammas, when the days start to grow shorter and we give thanks for the harvest that will sustain us through the winter months. It culminates in Yule, when the sun is at its weakest and we celebrate the rebirth of light.

In between these two halves are the four cross-quarter days, which are celebrated at the midpoint between the solstices and equinoxes. These festivals are Imbolc, Ostara, Mabon, and Litha.

Pagan festivals are often timed to coincide with natural events such as the changing of the seasons. They may also be scheduled to correspond with astronomical phenomena, such as the solstices and equinoxes.


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Festivals

Wickiana

In many traditions of modern Pagan cosmology, the universe is divided into the realms of matter and spirit. The material world is the realm of the five elements: earth, air, fire, water, and spirit. The spiritual world is the realm of the gods and goddesses.

The Wheel of the Year festivals are a time when the veil between these two realms is thinner and it is easier to commune with the spirit world.

The eight festivals that make up the Wheel of the Year are:

  • Samhain: October 31st – November 2nd
  • Beltane: April 30th – May 1st
  • Imbolc: February 1st – 2nd
  • Ostara: March 21st – 22nd
  • Litha: June 21st – 22nd
  • Lammas: August 1st – 2nd
  • Mabon: September 21st – 22nd
  • Yule: December 21st – 22nd

Each of these festivals has its own customs and traditions. Some are more solemn occasions, while others are times for feasting and merrymaking.

Samhain

Samhain
reuters.com

Samhain is the beginning of the Celtic year. It is a time when the veil between the world of the living and the world of the dead is at its thinnest. It is a time to remember our ancestors and to honor those who have died.

It is also a time to reflect on our own mortality and to prepare for the end of life.

Beltane (May Eve)

Beltane
bbc.com

Beltane is a spring festival celebrated on May 1st. It is also known as Walpurgisnacht, Roodmass, and May Day. The holiday marks the beginning of summer and the end of winter. It is a time to celebrate fertility, new beginnings, and growth.

Beltane was originally a Celtic festival honoring the goddess Beltane. The holiday was brought to the United States by immigrants from Britain and Ireland. Today, it is celebrated by Pagans, Wiccans, and other earth-based religions.

Beltane is a time to celebrate life and all of its bounties. It is a time to plant seeds, both literal and figurative. It is a time of new beginnings, growth, and fertility. Whether you are looking to start a new project, conceive a child, or simply want to celebrate the season, Beltane is the perfect time to do so.

Imbolc (Candlemas)

imbolc
ibtimes.com

Imbolc is a festival celebrated on February 2nd. It is also known as Candlemas, Groundhog Day, and Brigid’s Day. The holiday marks the halfway point between the winter solstice and the spring equinox. It is a time to celebrate fertility, new beginnings, and growth.

Imbolc was originally a Celtic holiday. It was later adopted by the Christian church and given the name Candlemas. The holiday is still celebrated by Pagans and Wiccans today.

Candles are an important part of Imbolc. They are used to represent the return of light and life to the world. Brigid, the goddess of fire and fertility, is also honored during this holiday.

Imbolc is a time to celebrate the coming of spring. It is a time of hope and new beginnings.

Ostara (Spring Equinox )

Ostara
Ostara_by_Johannes_Gehrts

Ostara is a festival celebrated on the vernal equinox. It is also known as Spring Equinox, Easter, and Eostre’s Day. The holiday marks the beginning of spring and the end of winter. It is a time to celebrate fertility, new beginnings, and growth.

Ostara was originally a Germanic holiday. The name Ostara comes from the Germanic Goddess of Spring, Eastre. She is also known as Ēostre, Ostare, Ostara, Eastra, and Eostur. Her festival was called Ēosturdæg (Eastur’s Day).

The festival of Ostara was celebrated with feasts, games, and bonfires. It was a time to welcome the spring and all of the new life it brings. Eggs were often decorated and given as gifts. Rabbits were also associated with the holiday, as they are known for their fertility.

In modern times, Ostara is celebrated by Pagans and Wiccans all over the world. It is a time to celebrate the change of seasons and the cycle of life. This holiday is also celebrated by Christians as Easter.

Litha (Summer Solstice )

Litha
According to pagans, Stonehenge is a sacred place that links the Earth, Moon, Sun, and the seasons. (Photo by Richard Baker / In Pictures via Getty Images)

Litha is a festival celebrated on the summer solstice. It is also known as Midsummer, Alban Hefin, and St. John’s Day. The holiday marks the longest day of the year and the beginning of summer. It is a time to celebrate the sun, fertility, new beginnings, and growth.

Litha was originally a pagan holiday. It was later assimilated into Christianity and is now celebrated by many pagans and Christians alike. The holiday has roots in the Celtic festival of Beltane and the Germanic festival of Walpurgisnacht.

Litha is typically celebrated with bonfires, feasting, and merrymaking. It is a time to enjoy the outdoors and the warmer weather. Many people use the holiday as an opportunity to take a vacation or go on a camping trip.

Lammas (Lughnasadh)

Lammas
reverseritual.com

Lammas is a festival celebrated on August 1st. It is also known as Lughnasadh, Lammas Tide, and First Harvest. The holiday marks the beginning of the harvest season. It is a time to celebrate fertility, new beginnings, and growth.

Lammas was originally a Celtic holiday. It was later assimilated into Christianity. The holiday is still celebrated by Pagans and Wiccans today.

Lammas is a time to give thanks for the abundance of the land. It is also a time to celebrate the harvest and prepare for the winter months ahead. Lammas is a time of feasting, dancing, and merriment.

On this day, Pagans and Wiccans give thanks for the gifts of the Earth. They also celebrate the cycle of life, death, and rebirth. Lammas is a time to reflect on the past year and set intentions for the year ahead.

Mabon (Autumn Equinox)

Mabon

Mabon is a festival celebrated on September 21st. It is also known as the Autumn Equinox, Alban Elfed, and Harvest Home. The holiday marks the beginning of autumn. It is a time to celebrate the harvest and give thanks for the bounty of the land.

Mabon was originally a Celtic holiday. It was later adopted by the Wiccan and Pagan communities. The holiday is now celebrated by many people around the world, regardless of religious affiliation.

Mabon is a time to reflect on the past year and prepare for the coming winter. It is also a time to celebrate the bounty of the land and give thanks for all that we have.

Yule (Winter Solstice)

yule
An image of an ancient Yule celebration, from the German newspaper, Die Gartenlaube in 1880. / Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain

Yule is a festival celebrated on December 21st. It is also known as the Winter Solstice, Alban Arthan, and Midwinter. The holiday marks the longest night of the year and the beginning of winter.

Yule was originally a pagan festival celebrated by the Germanic people. The holiday was eventually absorbed into Christianity and is now celebrated as Christmas.

Pagan festivals often involve rituals and ceremonies that are designed to honor the gods and goddesses. They may also include activities such as feasting, dancing, and story-telling. Pagan festivals are a great way to connect with nature and the cycle of the seasons. They are also a time to celebrate life, death, and rebirth.

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